Network optimisation

Collinson Grant improves the performance of branches by aligning practices with the corporate business model, designing footprints, lines and substance of reporting, and specifications for the exercise of authority.

Richard Hendry and Ivan Carr reviewing working practices with Pauline Kelly at Cooper-Menvier

We can make your branches grow

Collinson Grant improves the performance of branches by aligning practices with the corporate business model, designing footprints, lines and substance of reporting, and specifications for the exercise of authority.

To make a branch network function well, it must be clear whether head office or the branch will have the final say on: pricing; terms and conditions for trading; procurement and inventory; trading policies; payroll and operating costs; managing employees; and processes and systems. Otherwise, confusion will reign and mistakes will cost money.

In Collinson Grant's experience, it is best for most businesses to default to a model that we call 'loose/tight'. In contrast to other more centralised structures, it emphasises wide accountability for profit by managers carefully selected for their entrepreneurial qualities. In short, get the right person and give them as much responsibility as they can reasonably and responsibly handle.

Our expertise in this area is based on working for several clients whose business depends on effectively managing the performance of people in a far-flung branch network.

For a large vehicle hire business in the UK, we reorganised 12 regional companies into six similar-sized units and drew up a new blueprint covering operations, staffing and capabilities, which helped to overcome variations in customer service. Our work transformed the group, making it more unified, efficient and responsive to customers, and less costly to run.

Managerial controls Structure and accountabilities Pan-European businesses